Thoughts on the NFL protest

2 mins read
I haven’t watched an NFL game in some years; the league and its goings on do not really capture my interest. Still, this weekend will probably mark a significant battle in the culture war, all things considered.
So some thoughts, in no particular order:
Kneeling is historically a symbol of submission.

1. I don’t care if the NFL implodes. Once an organization gives itself over to SJW virtue signalling, there is nothing left but to watch its inevitable seppuku. What starts with pink shoes always ends in full-blown moonbattery. Screw them.
2. The players have a constitutional right to kneel. However, as employees who represent a company* and have signed a contract that requires they stand for the anthem, things are a little more complicated than that. The fans pay you to perform, not complain.
3. It’s interesting to watch the left/right trade arguments this week:
Left, last week: Anyone who attended the UTR protest should be fired!
Right, last week: Muh free speech!
Right, this week: Those players who knelt should be fired!
Left, this week: Muh free speech!
4. Trump knew exactly what he was doing when he exacerbated the situation. What began allegedly a protest against police brutality suddenly became about Trump, and therefore partisan, and therefore unserious. Now the left is forced to defend (once again) the unpopular and Trump is suddenly the defender of all things American.
5. Lots of red pills handed out this weekend. The NFL’s primary audience is precisely those kinds of guys who are going to react viscerally to the symbolism of kneeling players. The protesters chose the anthem because they knew viewers would not ignore it. I doubt they thought about the reaction they would thereby unleash.
6. In the end, this ‘protest’ is simply a bunch of bitchy millionaires virtue-signaling and will serve only to inoculate normal Americans against SJW posturing. The longer it goes on, and the more damage it does to the NFL brand, the better. Here’s to hoping it takes down ESPN as well.
* they are wearing the company’s *uniform* for pete’s sake.
 

El Borak is an historian by training, an IT Director by vocation, and a writer when the mood strikes him. He lives in rural Kansas with his wife of thirty years, where he works to fix the little things.

9 Comments

    • One can be opposed to police brutality while realizing that it is being exaggerated, mischaracterized, and abused to support a marxist narrative.

  1. Seems a false equivalency between UTR and workplace behavior. Nobody would care if an NFL player went to a protest after work. The left, however, expect total compliance in and out of the workplace.

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