“IF” – Rudyard Kipling

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4 mins read

If you can keep your head when all about you
Are losing theirs and blaming it on you,   
If you can trust yourself when all men doubt you,
But make allowance for their doubting too;   
If you can wait and not be tired by waiting,
Or being lied about, don’t deal in lies,
Or being hated, don’t give way to hating,
And yet don’t look too good, nor talk too wise:
 
If you can dream—and not make dreams your master;   
If you can think—and not make thoughts your aim;   
If you can meet with Triumph and Disaster
And treat those two impostors just the same;   
If you can bear to hear the truth you’ve spoken
Twisted by knaves to make a trap for fools,
Or watch the things you gave your life to, broken,
And stoop and build ’em up with worn-out tools:
 
If you can make one heap of all your winnings
And risk it on one turn of pitch-and-toss,
And lose, and start again at your beginnings
And never breathe a word about your loss;
If you can force your heart and nerve and sinew
To serve your turn long after they are gone,   
And so hold on when there is nothing in you
Except the Will which says to them: ‘Hold on!’
 
If you can talk with crowds and keep your virtue,   
Or walk with Kings—nor lose the common touch,
If neither foes nor loving friends can hurt you,
If all men count with you, but none too much;
If you can fill the unforgiving minute
With sixty seconds’ worth of distance run,   
Yours is the Earth and everything that’s in it,   
And—which is more—you’ll be a Man, my son!
 
This should be familiar to anyone with even passing familiarity of Western civilization.
Kipling’s wisdom applies as much today as it ever has. Antifa is locking horns with those that stand for civilization. Battles will be fought. Some will end in victory, others will have consequences we will not like. The more we stand up to the forces of anti-West and anti-Christianity, the louder and more violent those forces will become.
In the face of such madness, we have to keep our heads.
These teens recently exemplified what Kipling was driving at in his poem.
The assistant principal lost his head. Look how ridiculous he acts. The teens recording are cool as cucumbers. That assistant isn’t a man, in any sense of the word, and certainly not a Man of the West. He’s a parasite being exposed to the light.
We can’t change what is going to happen, what insane decisions and actions the Progressives and their fellow travelers will undertake. But we can decide how we will respond.
Decide now to meet these challenges with your head on, if you can rebuild when there’s nothing left but the will to hold on, if you can meet the forces of anti-civilizations and emerge with your head high regardless of the outcome, the West will be yours again, and you will be a Man of the West.

3 Comments

  1. I highly recommend George Orwell’s essay on Kipling’s works. It’s an absolute tour de force. Naturally Orwell, as a committed socialist, takes issue with the imperialism that one finds in Kiplings’s works. But, as usual, his criticisms are not one-sided and thoughtful and hit home for me especially because of the point of you Blair was writing from.

    • Thanks for the suggestion. I have not read the essay but Orwell was a gifted writer. It would be interesting to see his perspective.

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